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Coronavirus information

We’ll always act in the best interests of the people who use or work within our services; therefore while we aim to continue to deliver our services as business as usual, we’ll balance this with our responsibility to ensure that the safety of our service users and colleagues is maintained.  Our pandemic management team continue to review the latest government guidance and information (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-information-for-the-public) and update our plans, to ensure we’re aligned to the latest position. If you’re one of our service users and have returned from one of the countries affected with Coronavirus (as listed on the government website) within the last 14 days or had contact with somebody with Coronavirus and has a cough, fever or shortness of breath, in addition to calling 111,...

Service Disruptions

Service disruptions Due to the inclement weather and the requirement to keep both our staff and service users safe, a number of our wheelchair services which are particularly affected by the conditions are running a reduced service. Normal level of service will resume as soon as it is safe to do so. In the meantime, if you require further information about the level of service available in your area, then please use the usual wheelchair service telephone number. However, due to the reduced staffing levels, please can we ask that you only contact the service if it is an emergency or you have an urgent query. The wheelchair services most badly affected are: Somerset Plymouth and West Devon Isle of Wight Hampshire We thank you...

Dementia Friends – Plymouth

We're really proud of our Plymouth community equipment and wheelchair services teams for becoming Dementia Friends. About Dementia Friends A Dementia Friend learns a little bit more about what it's like to live with dementia and then turns that understanding into action - anyone of any age can be a Dementia Friend. Dementia Friends Information Sessions are run by volunteer Dementia Friends Champions (for our Plymouth service centre, this is Rebecca O'Donovan), who are trained and supported by the Alzheimer’s Society. Rebecca will carry out further information sessions with any new starters who join the team. Our colleagues at our Plymouth community equipment and wheelchair services have all attended a Dementia Friends session held by Rebecca. We have recently joined forces with Dementia Action Alliance,...

Dementia Awareness

About Dementia Dementia is a common problem, usually occurring in people over the age of 65 years. Dementia in itself is not a disease, but is a collection of symptoms caused by certain conditions. Symptoms Dementia has numerous symptoms associated with a decline in brain function, including • memory loss • thinking speed • mental agility • language • understanding • judgement Other symptoms can include: • difficulties with concentration • depression • personality and mood changes • confusion • difficulty finding the right words Diagnosis An early diagnosis helps with getting the right treatment and to plan for the future. In diagnosing dementia, a GP will conduct a series of tests, such as a physical examination, blood test and memory tasks. The doctor may...

Dangerous plants

Dangerous plants We are lucky in the UK that we have few dangerous plants.  Most plants are harmless; however, some do sting, scratch or are poisonous. Keep your family safe by reading the guide to plant hazards on the NHS website. See our pointers below: Giant hogweed Giant hogweed can be a big danger; causing severe, painful burns and making your skin sun-sensitive if brushed against. It can grow up to 5m tall, often along footpaths and riverbanks. What to do: If you come into contact with this plant, cover the affected area and wash it with soap and water. The blisters heal very slowly and can cause a skin rash which flares up in sunlight. Always visit your GP if you feel unwell after...

Alcohol Awareness

With the festive season looming, you might be tempted to indulge in a little more alcohol than usual. The NHS recommends that both men and women should not regularly drink more than 14 units of alcohol per week.  See our handy guide below for what a unit actually is – your intake may be more than you think. Impact on health Alcohol can cause major health problems that include diseases of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, heart, mouth, throat, larynx and colon, to name but a few, as well as contributing to high blood pressure and depression. The relationship between alcohol and disease is mostly related to the amount of alcohol consumed; i.e. the more you drink, the greater the risk.   Driving It goes without...
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